Pupil Premium and Sports Premium

Pupil Premium

 Pupil premium funding is provided to support pupils who, for example,  access free school meals or who are in the care of the local authority.

2017-2018 (starting April 2017)

In 2017/2018 we received £18,480 and use £5,181 carried forward from the previous year.

Funding will be used in order to fulfil the following:

Subsidise breakfast club places by paying 50% of breakfast club salaries and paying for the places of individual children (£5800)  Provide one to one and small group tuition ( £5181)

Provide free school milk  for individual children (£100)  Finance any other interventions as necessary (using any additional funds for Looked After Children)  Maintain small class sizes  

Our rationale behind these decisions

We believe that support with learning in school should be the main driver for improving outcomes.  Attendance is prioritised through the work of the breakfast club because we know that good attendance is vital for achievement in school.   We believe that healthy lifestyles are important and that the provision of milk should be as important as a healthy school lunch.

2016 - 2017 (starting April 2016)   Pupil Premium

In 2016/2017 we received £18780 and used £5644 carried forward from the previous year.

Funding was used in order to fulfil the following:

Subsidise breakfast club places by paying 50% of breakfast club salaries and paying for the places of individual children (£5800) Provide one to one and small group tuition ( £2360 until the end of May 2016, and a further £9761 from June 2016. Provide free school milk  for individual children (£100). Finance the additional salary and training for  family support worker (£400) Finance any other interventions as necessary (using any additional funds for Looked After Children). Provide full time one to one and small group tuition ( £6000 from January 2017 – April 2017)

All children with access to PP funding are to receive at least 1 hour of small group tuition per week .  50% of children with access to PP funding to receive at least 2 hours of small group tuition per week.  25% of children with access to PP funding are to receive at least 3 hours of group tuition per week.

Our rationale behind these decisions

We believe that support with learning in school should be the main driver for improving outcomes. We also recognise the importance of pastoral support and therefore link our pastoral and academic systems of support together through our family support worker and leadership team. Attendance is prioritised through the work of the breakfast club because we know that good attendance is vital for achievement in school. We believe that healthy lifestyles are important and that the provision of milk should be as important as a healthy school lunch

Impact on attainment

A full analysis will be available at the end of the 2016/2017 academic year but early indications (as of Easter 2017) show that

100% of children in Year 1 who access Pupil Premium will have met the national expectations for phonics and at least expected progress has been made across Reading, Writing and Maths.  Pupil Premium Reading data shows greater progress when compared with the whole cohort.

Children in Year 2 who access Pupil Premium have made slightly less than expected progress across Reading, Writing and Maths.  This compares with the whole cohort who have made above expected progress.

Children in Year 3 who access Pupil Premium have made more than expected progress in Reading, Writing and Maths.  This compares with the whole cohort who have made only expected progress.

Children in Year 4 who access Pupil Premium have made slightly below expected progress in Reading and Writing and expected progress in Maths. This compares with the whole cohort who have made slightly above expected progress in all subjects. 

Children in Year 5 who access Pupil Premium have made slightly less than expected progress in Reading and less than expected progress in Writing and Maths.  This compares with the whole cohort who have made less than expected progress.

Children in Year 6 who access Pupil Premium have made less than expected progress in Reading, Writing and Maths.  This compares with the whole cohort who have made slightly less than expected progress in Reading and Writing and less than expected progress in Maths.

Please note that due to small cohorts and data protection requirements, it would be inappropriate to comment on the attainment of the children.

Impact on attendance

September –December 2016  2016 attendance for children who access the pupil premium and also attend breakfast club regularly.  The average attendance between  September 2016 and December 2016 for this group is 96%   We therefore feel that this strategy is successful (attendance for PP is 93%) and should therefore continue, but that other strategies are needed to raise the attendance of the whole group. Further interventions will include a music workshop in the morning for children who maintain 98%+ attendance.

Impact on Education Welfare

Our pupil premium leader and teacher have been able to assess children's welfare needs using the Boxall profile, and to plan their learning and provision from their 'Boxall' starting points where necessary.

A range of small group sessions provided children with opportunities to develop communication occurred during the spring and summer term 2016.  These sessions were linked to those families who received access to the Early Help Programme. Focus was given for effective early intervention support. 

2015 - 2016 (starting April 2015)

In 2015/2016 we received funding of £23760 and use £4908  carried forward from the previous year.

Funding was used in order to fulfil the following:

Subsidise breakfast club places by paying 50% of breakfast club salaries and paying for the places of individual children (£5721). Provide one to one and small group tuition (£12445.76). Provide free school milk  for individual children (£100). Finance the cost of small group tuition in English and Maths for one term (summer 2015), in Key Stage 2 (£7065). Finance training for school staff around the needs of Looked After and adopted children (£500). Finance the additional salary and training for newly appointed family support worker (£400) Finance any other interventions as necessary

Our rationale behind these decisions

We believe that support with learning in school should be the main driver for improving outcomes.  We also recognise the importance of pastoral support and therefore link our pastoral and academic systems of support together through our family support worker and leadership team. Attendance is prioritised through the work of the breakfast club because we know that good attendance is vital for achievement in school. We believe that healthy lifestyles are important and that the provision of milk should be as important as a healthy school lunch.

Impact on attainment - Year 1 phonics test, KS1 and KS2 SATs 

The number of children in Early Years, KS1 , Year 4 and Year 6 are too low to report on without identifying children. Cohorts in Years 3 and 5 are  still very small so only generic information is given here, based on the school year. Children in Year 3 who access the pupil premium have made more than expected progress in reading, writing and maths. Children in Year 5 who access the pupil premium have made more than expected progress in reading, writing and maths.

Impact on attendance

The average attendance between September 2015 and May 2016 for this group is 97.1%. This is 0.1% higher than out whole school attendance at the same time, but significantly higher than our overall attendance percentage for pupil premium (95.96%).  100% of these children have maintained good and outstanding attendance from last school year.

Impact on Education Welfare

Our newly appointed family support worker has been able to engage 5 families who access pupil premium funds with  early help arrangements to meet the needs of family members. All aspects of children's welfare are considered through the early help process.  Our pupil premium leader and teacher have been able to assess children's welfare needs using the Boxall profile, and to plan their learning and provision from their 'Boxall' starting points where necessary.

2014 - 2015 (starting April 2014)

In financial year 2014/2015 we received £24000 and used £478.26 carried forward from the previous year.

Funding was used in order to fulfil the following:

Subsidise breakfast club places by paying 50% of breakfast club salaries and paying for the places of individual children (£4853).  Provide one to one and small group tuition (£6940.55) Provide free school milk (£60). Contribute towards the cost of small class sizes (£7716.71)

The remaining funds (£4908) were then allocated to the 2015/2016 budget.

Our rationale behind these decisions

In 2014/2015 we felt that further teaching support was necessary to raise the attainment of children who access pupil premium funds and that small class sizes at this point in our improvement journey were essential. We believed that support with learning in school should be the main driver for improving outcomes. We believed that healthy lifestyles are important and that the provision of milk should be as important as a healthy school lunch.

Impact on attainment - Year 1 phonics test, KS1 and KS2 SATs 

Children accessing pupil premium funds at the time of the Year 1 phonics test in June 2015 achieved the same standard as their peers (100% pass). Children accessing pupil premium funds who were at the end of Key Stage 1 in July 2015 made slightly less progress than their peers in reading and maths over the course of the school year. They made slightly more progress than their peers in writing.  The percentage of children accessing the pupil premium achieving Level 2 was slightly lower than it was for their peers in reading, writing and maths.

Children accessing pupil premium funds who were at the end of Key Stage 2 in July 2015 made slightly more progress in reading across Key Stage 2 than their peers. Slightly more children accessing pupil premium funds achieved Level 4 than their peers in reading, but slightly fewer achieved Level 5.  Children accessing pupil premium funds who were at the end of Key Stage 2 in July 2015 made less progress in writing across Key Stage 2 than their peers.  Slightly more children accessing pupil premium funds achieved Level 4 than their peers in writing, but fewer achieved Level 5.  Children accessing pupil premium funds who were at the end of Key Stage 2 in July 2015 made less progress in maths across Key Stage 2 than their peers.  Fewer children accessing pupil premium funds achieved Level 4 and 5. Slightly more children accessing pupil premium funds achieved both Level 4 and 5 in grammar, punctuation and spelling at the end of Key Stage 2 than their peers.

This information is based on averages, from SATS results

 

Impact on attendance

57% of the children accessing pupil premium funds who attended breakfast club regularly maintained excellent attendance (97% or above) from 2013/2014 to 2014/2015.

The remaining 43% improved their average attendance in 2013/2014 slightly, from 93.12% in July 2014 to 93.5% by July 2015 (on average).

2013/2014 (starting April 2013)

In financial year 2013/2014 we received £9500

Funding was used in order to fulfil the following:

This was used for targeted one to one and group tuition and to subsidise breakfast club attendance. 50% of the of breakfast club staff salaries were paid from pupil premium funds, and parents/carers of children entitled to the pupil premium did not pay for children to attend the club.

Our rationale behind these decisions

In 2013/2014 we believed that support with learning in school should be the main driver for improving outcomes.

Impact on attainment - Year 1 phonics test, KS1 and KS2 SATs 

Key Stage 1

Children accessing pupil premium funds who were at the end of Key Stage 1 in July 2014 made the same amount of progress as their peers in reading, writing and maths.

Key Stage 2

Children accessing pupil premium funds who were at the end of Key Stage 2 in July 2014 made slightly more progress than their peers in reading, writing and maths.

Impact on attendance

50% of the children accessing pupil premium funds and who attended breakfast club regularly maintained at least good attendance (95% or higher) from 2012/2013 to 2013/2014.  50% of the children accessing pupil premium funds and who attended breakfast club regularly improved their attendance from below the expected level (less than 95%) in 2012/2013 to good (95% or higher) in 2013/2014.

 

Sports Premium

At Woodford Church of England Primary School we receive sport premium funding.

Sports Action Plan 2017-2018

Sports Action Plan 2016-2017

The PE Grant Allocation in 2016/2017

We are continuing to be part of the Wellingborough and East Northants Sport Partnership which enables us to participate in a range of cluster festivals and county events. We have entered a netball league this year, after great success last year when we won the league. We are also entering two competitions designed to include children with special needs and disabilities this year, with the aim of including more children in district competitions. We are continuing to use the real PE program across the school in PE lessons. The year 6 sports leaders are running regular activities and competitions during lunchtimes. We are taking part in continuous professional development to ensure that staff are up to date in all current practises. The new minibus has been purchased and two members of staff are qualified to drive it, and this will help us to continue to participate in competitions in the long term. We have continued to run a change for life club, and begun other new strategies to encourage all of the pupils to keep fit and healthy. For example, all the children will be taking part in 10 minutes of physical activity every day before their lunch.

Sports Action Plan 2015-2016

The PE Grant Allocation in 2015/2016

In the academic year 2015/16, Woodford C of E Primary School received a PE Grant of £8,238.

We are continuing to be part of the Wellingborough and East Northants Sport Partnership which enables us to participate in a range of cluster festivals and county events. We have also entered a netball league this year, with the aim of increasing participation in the sport, particularly amongst girls who might not be active otherwise. We are now using the real PE program across the school in PE lessons.  The year 6 sports leaders are running regular activities and competitions during lunchtimes. We are taking part in continuous professional development to ensure that staff are up to date in all current practises. The staff are also being trained to drive a minibus which we will be purchasing during the summer holidays, and this will help us to continue to participate in competitions in the long term. We have continued to run a change for life club, and begun other new strategies to encourage all of the pupils to keep fit and healthy. 

Sports Action Plan 2014-2015

The PE Grant Allocation in 2014/2015

We continued to be part of the Wellingborough and East Northants Sport Partnership which enabled us to participate in a range of cluster festivals and county events with the provision of one day per week coaching expertise. We began staff training and purchased resources for  ‘Real PE’,  to engage all children with the PE curriculum. Change for life activities were run during breakfast club, the aim of which was to get less active children moving. Year 6 pupils became sports leaders and led activities for the younger children on the playground during lunchtimes. Year 5 trained up as sports leaders in the summer term, in preparation for taking over this role in September 2015. 

Sports Action Plan 2013-2014 

The PE Grant Allocation in 2013/14

 Our aim was to use this grant to improve the quality and breadth of PE and sport provision across the school, develop increased participation in PE and sport, and encourage pupils to develop healthy lifestyles and to achieve their best level of performance.

This grant was used to provide opportunity for children across the school: to participate in sports festivals within our cluster and within the county; to provide qualified coaches to work alongside teachers to enhance and develop coaching skills; to provide extra-curricular sports clubs; to provide sports leadership training for children and to provide new equipment. 

The impact has been that more children have been able to participate in a wider range of PE and sport, developing confidence in their ability to improve performance. Teachers have grown in confidence when teaching areas of the curriculum they are less confident with. By participating in sports festivals children have had a greater opportunity for more coaching and greater opportunity for competition. Children have had a greater opportunity for leadership and team skills promoting confidence in other curriculum areas in school.